Diana and Actaeon

Diana and Actaeon is a painting produced between 1556 and 1559 by Italian painter Titian.

The National Gallery of London and The National Gallery of Scotland together successfully campaigned to acquire the painting Diana and Actaeon from the Bridgewater Collection for 50 million Euros.

Diana and Actaeon is one of seven large mythologies, famous canvases named as 'the poesies' depicting mythological scenes from Ovid's Metamorphoses. Titian produced seven large mythologies from 1549 to 1562 for King Philip II of Spain when Holy Roman Emperor, Maximilian II had declined Titian's offer to paint them for him. Titian first met Philip in Milan in 1548 and then at the Imperial Diet at Augsburg in the winter between 1550 and 1551 seems that the project has been conceived during both occasions as Titian also painted the prince’s portrait. This painting portrays the moment in which the goddess Diana meets Actaeon. The dimensions of the painting are 185 cm × 202 cm (73 in × 80 in).

The work can be viewed at National Gallery, London

Artist: Titian
Location: National Gallery, London
Medium: Oil on Canvas
Category: Tags: ,

Description

Diana and Actaeon is a painting produced between 1556 and 1559 by Italian painter Titian.

Diana is a character from mythology, a woman on the right side of the painting. In the painting Diana and Actaeon, she was wearing a crown with a crescent moon on it and which was being covered by the dark skinned woman, Researchers think that she was her servant or a slave. King Philip II of Spain gave Titian exceptional freedom in choosing the subjects for the painting which were drawn from Ovid’s ‘Metamorphoses’.

Titian created the most ambitious and magnificent works of his entire career and that was the commission who stimulated. It was Titian who coined the term ‘poesie’ of seven large mythologies for his elegiac compositions because he regarded them as the visual equivalents of poetry. Diana and Actaeon will remain in the UK and will be allowed to alternate between the two galleries (The National Gallery of London and The National Gallery of Scotland) on five-year terms.

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